New website and news

[ profile] waveney has been poking around in the back end of the server for me, and I now have access to WordPress on my site. I’ve spent the last couple of days starting to build a new mobile-friendly website, and a good thing too, because this morning my publisher emailed me to say that tomorrow Nice Tie will be the Daily Deal at ARe, with 50% off. With any luck this will result in traffic, and I will even have a mobile-friendly top level page to point them at. Unfortunately it won’t be the landing page *just* yet, as I’m still building the thing, so I’ve had to be content with putting a link front and centre on the old site.

Testing would be appreciated… Also, I’m doing an overhaul in general, so if there is anything you’ve had a burning desire to see on my site, let me know. If it’s a sensible suggestion, I’ll consider how to incorporate it. If it’s not sensible, I’m sure it will amuse everyone else to read about your burning desire in the comments.

Book Log: Mr Bingo – Hate Mail: the Definitive Collection

I had far too much fun backing random “that looks interesting/amusing” publishing projects on Kickstarter a few months ago, and the fruits are now falling into my letterbox. Yesterday’s was this:

Hilariously obscene collection of Mr Bingo’s favourites from his Hate Mail project – pay good money to a professional artist to have him draw a lovingly rendered insult on the back of an item from his collection of vintage postcards, and post it to you. Having done nearly a thousand of these, he then launched a Kickstarter to publish his favourites as a high quality art book. Whether or not you enjoy the contents depends very much on your sense of humour, but if it is your sort of thing, here it is in a physical object that’s a work of art in itself. It’s printed on heavy art paper, Smyth-sewn, clothbound casing, and tastefully stamped in gold foil with the title on the spine and a line drawing on the front cover reflecting the contents. That line drawing being of an octopus putting two fingers up at the world with all eight legs…

Out now: Knotting the Tie

Knotting the Tie is out today. And… it’s currently free. It will probably remain free indefinitely at Loose Id, although official list price is $1.25. You’ll need to sign up for a Loose Id account to download it, but they don’t spam. You can read an excerpt at the book catalogue page before you sign up. (And thanks to Predatrix and Neyronrose for beta-reading this at very short notice. :-)

Knotting the Tie

KNotting the Tie cover art -- gay romance novel
After a year together, Alex knows what he has with Robin is for life, and he wants to stand up and say so in public. It’s time to propose, and he’s doing it the old fashioned way – roses, champagne and going down on one knee. But it may take more than that to persuade Robin it’s safe to put the past behind him. Maybe even more than the persuasive powers of a glass of champagne and going down on both knees…

This is a standalone sequel short story to Nice Tie – it’s the story of Alex proposing to Robin, but you can read it without knowing anything about the novel.

Available now at the Loose Id website:

Last chance to buy: Yule

Loose Id’s edition of Yule, the novelette I wrote with Lindsey Mullen, will be going out of print next month. If you’d like 9000 words of year’s end m/m BDSM romance, go and get it now. We’ll probably republish it at some point, but that may be a while…


Yule cover artAll Julian wants for Yule is his submissive: the gorgeous, blond, sexy Karl. But Karl has just got a new job in his homeland of Sweden. Can Julian arrange a session that’s intense enough to touch both Karl’s pagan beliefs and his heart and keep him in England?

Re-enacting the sacrifice of Odin upon Yggdrasil as a safe BDSM scenario might be the thing to give Karl inner knowledge; after all, Yule is the feast of Odin, the all-seeing. And submissives do find clarity in surrender…

Guest post: Jacey Bedford – The Gift That Keeps on Giving

Jacey is a long time friend from the Usenet writing group rec.arts.sf.composition – the sf is for science fiction, not San Francisco, as the group had to regularly explain to bemused newbies. :-) Jacey’s published by Daw; her second book was released a few months ago, and her third will be published early next year. If you want to know what it’s like to be picked up by a major name in SF&F publishing, read on. If you want to read what caught the acquiring editor’s eye, there’s a giveaway in the post…

My first book, Empire of Dust, launched on 4th November 2014 from DAW. I was so excited. I’d waited a long time for novel publication.

Empire of Dust cover artI got the first review (, from Publishers’ Weekly, no less, and read it with trepidation. (Hey, it was the first review of my first book, I was allowed to trepidate!) I read it and I read it again. Gradually it began to sink in. It was a good review. Then I looked back at the email that it had arrived in – a congratulatory email from my editor, enclosing the review. (I should have read that bit first and saved myself a giant case of the trepids.) It ends with: “Bedford builds a taut story around the dangers of a new world…. Readers who crave high adventure and tense plots will enjoy this voyage into the future.”

And it struck me, as I read it for the fourth or fifth time how author worries morph as you move along the path towards and beyond your publication. I was talking to Alastair Reynolds on Twitter not long ago (Al and I did our first ever Milford ( together back in 1998 before he got his first publishing deal and became mega-famous), and he reminded me that: ‘Worry is the gift that keeps on giving.’

First, you worry that your writing just isn’t good enough to make the grade. Despite all, you stay focused, finish your book, polish it, and think that, just possibly, it doesn’t suck too badly, but then you worry about selling it. Your first step is to find an agent. It may take months, it may take years, but eventually (if you jeep trying) you snag an agent and all of a sudden it feels as though you’ve leaped an insurmountable obstacle with one huge bound. Are your worries over? Of course not. The next big question is whether your precious manuscript will ever sell. (Truth? It might, it might not, but while you’re waiting keep on writing more.)

Craossways cover artIf you are very lucky (and luck does play a big part), all of a sudden, a sale, and your life changes in an instant. Are your worries over? Far from it, but they turn into different worries. Will the reviews be good? Will readers like it? Will sales be good enough to cover the advance your publisher has paid you? Will you get a follow-on publishing deal after this? I think most authors will recognise this cycle of self-doubt and worry (and hard work), but the thrill of seeing the finish line racing towards you makes you forget the speedbumps along the road to publication.

My first completed book didn’t sell, and neither did my second (unsurprising because it was a sequel to the first – duh!), but my third, Empire of Dust, sold (though not until I’d written seven altogether!). I not only sold Empire, but in the same deal I sold my fifth completed manuscript (a historical fantasy called Winterwood) and got a commission for a sequel to Empire. Yeah, a three book deal with DAW, my dream publisher of science fiction and fantasy! Pretty cool, huh?

Winterwood cover artI was offered the first sale in July 2013. After a year of edits, rewrites, additions, inventions, reinventions, and just about the craziest most creative spurt of my life to date, my debut book, Empire of Dust, hit the shelves in November 2014 and the sequel, Crossways in August 2015.

Word of mouth and social media are hugely important, especially in these days of diminishing browsing opportunities as high street bookstores disappear from our towns and cities. If you like a book, SHOUT about it to your friends, on Facebook, Twitter, your blog and all the many possible outlets. Your shouts are the oxygen the publishing industry needs.

Thank you to Jules for hosting this. Thank you to you for reading.

I have a mailing list on mailchimp. If you’d like to sign up to receive occasional emails (and I do mean occasional) I’d be very pleased if you would go to my website and sign up here: I will be giving ARC copies to random subscribers. The twenty third person to sign up will get a copy, as will the fifty-first

My Books, Present and Future

Empire of Dust, DAW, November 2014 – Psi-Tech #1

Space opera. Is there anywhere in the galaxy that’s safe for a Telepath who knows too much? Evil megacorporations, planetary settlements, Psi-techs implanted with psionic technology, a star-spanning manhunt, treachery… and love. Cara and Ben battle huge odds to save a settlement, but can they save themselves?

Crossways, DAW, August 2015 – Psi-Tech #2

A hunt for survivors turns into a battle for survival. This follows on where Empire of Dust leaves off. An illegal freeport space-station, a lost ship full of settlers, renegade Psi-Techs… and the megacorporations want revenge on Cara and Ben. They’ll go to any lengths to get it. But something is stirring in the depths of foldspace.

Winterwood, DAW, February 2016 – Rowankind #1

The start of a new historical fantasy series, set in 1800, in a Britain with magic, featuring Ross, a cross-dressing privateer captain who likes her life in the high seas accompanied by a boat-load of barely-reformed pirates and the jealous ghost of her late husband. On a deathbed visit to her estranged mother, Ross gets an inheritance she doesn’t want. Enter Corwen, handsome wolf shapechanger…

Silverwolf, DAW, Late 2016/early 2017 – Rowankind #2

The further adventures of Ross and Corwen as they struggle with the changes in Britain after the events in the first Rowankind book.

Nimbus, DAW, 2017 – Psi-Tech #3

Something is stirring in the depths of Foldspace and unless Ben and Cara can convince the megacorporations that dealing with it is more important than profit the human race is doomed.

Jacey Bedford

Jacey at Novacon 2012Jacey Bedford is a British author of science fiction and fantasy, agented by Amy Boggs of the Donald Maass Literary Agency and published by DAW in the USA, with (currently) five books under contract. She’s also sold short stories on both sides of the Atlantic and has been translated into Estonian, Polish and Galician. She’s secretary of the Milford SF Writers’ Conference in the UK [Link:]

Writer Links

Twitter: @jaceybedford




Book review: Diana Green – Bronze Fox

Posting well out of order since this is a review copy. I may or may not get earlier book log done…

Note: I received a copy of the book from the author through Reading Alley in exchange for an honest review.

Tobias is both a fox shapeshifter and a rifter – someone who crosses the rifts between worlds. He works as a field agent for a covert organisation that tries to control rift traffic, but he’s of an independent mind even if he’s loyal to the organisation. He needs a partner agent suited to him, not one chosen for him to suit others’ views.

Etty’s from the slums, barely earning a living by disguising herself as a boy and driving her dad’s hackney carriage after he was injured. She’s driving the nearest cab when Tobias needs a quick getaway one night, and her world will never be the same again.

Tobias may have stumbled upon the perfect sidekick, but first he’ll have to convince the people who pay his wages. And even if he does, there’s a baptism of fire waiting for the new partnership. There’s a whisper of new technology that could change the rift worlds forever — and it’s in the hands of a vicious criminal.

This is an excellent fantasy thriller with a strong romance subplot. The lead characters are engaging and well drawn, and I finished the book wanting to spend more time with them. There’s some good world-building, with the main setting being roughly Victorian with low key magic, but references and scenes that make it clear the rift links to worlds at different levels of social and technological development.

This is the first book in a series, and sets up the universe and series arc. It does an excellent job of wrapping up its own story without an annoying cliffhanger while still pointing the way to the next book. I’ve been annoyed of late by too many books that tried to force me to buy the next by not giving me the resolution to the story – this book does it the better way, by making me want to spend more time in this world.

I’ve only two minor criticisms; there’s a scene that’s flat out “beautiful blue-eyed blonde girl awes the primitive natives”, and there are some formatting glitches in my copy that made two chapters very difficult to read. It’s a measure of how much I was enjoying the book that I persisted through the section with scrambled formatting.

Overall a very enjoyable read, and I’m looking forward to the next in the series.

at Amazon UK
at Amazon US